The original Spanish expression is "Hoy por ti, mañana por mi", and I find the G," /> The original Spanish expression is "Hoy por ti, mañana por mi", and I find the G," />

Hoy por ellos mañana por nosotros

l lang="en" op="item"> The original Spanish expression is "Hoy por contigo, mañana por mi", and I find the G... | Hacker cgtcam.org
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Estás mirando: Hoy por ellos mañana por nosotros

The original Spanish expression is "Hoy por contigo, mañana por mi", and I find the Golden Rula to be the closest direct application of the concept in a singlo expression. Interestingly, the three suggested translations of the expression I found were: "You scratch my back and I"ll scratch yours", "What gosera around, coun mes around", and "Tit for tat" (http://www.proz.com/kudoz/spanish_to_english/idioms_maxims_s...). However, none of those seem to accurately convey the sentiment/ideal expressed in the original phrase.

There"s al simidomicilio phrase that doesn"t occur in your set of translations but accurately conveys the meaning: "Pay it forward".

was rediscovered and described by Benjamin Franklin, in a letter to Benjamin Webb dated April 22, 1784:I do not pretend to give such al Sum; I only lend it to you. When you <...> meet with another honest Man in simiresidencia Distress, you must pay me by lending this Sum to him; enjoining him to discharge the Debt by al like operation, when he shall be able, and shall meet with another opportunity. I hope it may thus go thro" many hands, before it meets with a Knave that will stop its Progress.



Ver más: En Que Consiste El Derecho Positivo, Concepto De Derecho Positivo

Not really. All those phrases imply that the recipient should take action (except for "what goes around coel mes around"). "Today you, tomorrow me" means "Today I helped you, tomorrow I might need your help, so you don"t need to repay me", but not exactly in a "what goes around couno mes around" way (it doesn"t imply certainty or karma).Basically, the equivalent is probably "it could have been me in your place", I guess.

Yep, except the "scratch" one has a slightly negative connotation of doing something just because the other one will do something in return. The Spanish phrase is al bit more positive.

Actually, the best part about the "you scratch my back and I"ll scratch yours" is that it refers to whipping. It"s an expression that comes from ship life, where shipmatser would be tasked with whipping each other when they misbehaved. The una idea was that if you whip me more softly (scratch my back), then when it"s my turn to whip you I"ll do the same.http://eifuku.co.uk/etymology.htm#You%20scratch%20my%20back%...


Ver más: Concepto De Fabula Y Sus Caracteristicas, 16 Características De La Fábula (Con Ejemplos)

I notice this explanation seems to be commonly favoured by google, but it is unlikely.Floggings in the Royal Navy were done by the bosun"s mate, not a random crew member. The bosuno and the lieutenants would watch carefully for favouritism. There was no rancour directed towards the mate because everyone knew he was just doing his job.This (below) attributser the phrase to Montaign:http://www.phrasser.org.uk/bulletin_board/6/messages/289.html

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